The Journey of Steel

A comic to walk through the world of steel

Brand Space | Exhibition

The exhibition for the world’s largest steel company ArcelorMittal

For the world’s largest steel company, ArcelorMittal, Archimedes has designed a walk-through comic in Ostrava, that leads visitors through a journey into the world of steel. Using a combination of hand drawings and renderings, Archimedes has created an exhibition landscape which allows plenty of room for creativity and new knowledge.

In the exhibition, visitors get to know steel in all its facets and learn more about the range and significance of this creative material. Since steel is at the beginning of so many products, it is almost omnipresent in our everyday lives. Steel is referred to as the “raw material” of modern economies and societies. In addition, steel is not only particularly versatile, but also sustainable as it is 100% recyclable. Moreover, ArcelorMittal and Archimedes Exhibitions show the aesthetic side of steel, which is not only rough and solid, dark or archaic, but also forms the basis for design, clinical laboratory equipment and everyday objects.

Visitors are repeatedly asked in the exhibition to become active themselves. Therefor they can produce their own design object: a spoon made of steel. The visitor has to expend energy, to pull, crank, turn until he has produced his own spoon. The approach of the exhibition is not static, but interactive and moving. To a certain extent, the scenery never stands still, just as the blast furnace of a steelworks constantly boils.

Client: ArcelorMittal Ostrava Exhibition Space: 260 m² Opening: 2015 Languages: Czech | English | Polish

More Information: https://www.plotmag.com/blog/2015/10/journeyofsteel/

Project Highlight

Comic-Genre

A comic to walk through

For the style of this exhibition, we deliberately chose a comic scenography. It creates a sympathetic and lively world in which the imagination of the visitors can run free. In front of a drawn and animated landscape, the visitor can operate the interactive exhibits both physically and digitally by their own hand. Large comic arrows and speech bubbles convey key messages, special effects such as light and sound underline the scenery. The huge machinery and equipment from steelmaking are cut open, are sort of “dissected” and provide unique insights into processes that are otherwise invisible.